The Physics In Soccer

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There is physics all around people in their everyday lives. People do not think about the many ways physics influences them. Physics can be found anywhere including in sports, and soccer has a lot of physics that are very crucial to the sport. The laws of physics, including physics on a soccer player, ball, and Newton’s three laws, are essential to playing soccer.

The laws of physics have a large impact on the soccer ball. This is demonstrated in the momentum on a ball. Whenever a soccer player kicks the ball, they transfer the momentum from their leg to the ball; this is the result from the formula for momentum p=m*v. The momentum is calculated by the mass of the soccer player multiplied by his velocity. Also displayed here is the law of conservation of momentum in that when the leg kicks the ball, the total momentum is conserved between the leg and the ball, and also when the leg slows down the velocity of the ball, the momentum is also still conserved (Acevedo, par. 1).

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In addition to momentum, friction is always involved in soccer whether it is rolling friction or sliding friction. Rolling friction is the friction that acts upon an object when it rolls across a surface. Rolling friction can be demonstrated through the ball rolling across the grass or turf field. There are different types of fields that affect the balls friction on the field. With grass the rolling friction is more and slows down the ball faster. On turf the friction takes less affect and the ball can move much faster because it rolls more naturally and faster across the field causing less friction. Sliding friction occurs when two solid objects slide over each other.

Sliding friction takes effect when the players are running up and down the field from all over. Sliding friction makes it to where the players are not sliding all over the field but makes it where they are able to get grip and turn quickly toward the ball. Running is an example of sliding friction and running is a huge part of soccer so that is where it takes place as well.

The acceleration on a soccer ball greatly influences the game. How much acceleration is determined on how hard the ball is kicked by the soccer player. The ball must be kicked with just the right amount of acceleration for it to roll the distance you want it to go. There is more acceleration put on a soccer ball when it is shot so the ball can go much quicker and lift up faster. On passes there is most of the time less acceleration because the player wants it to get to the teammate as accurately as possible. The acceleration on the ball is a big factor and is very important to the game and a big factor to consider while playing.

Acceleration is another huge part of soccer, whether the player needs to speed up or slow down or keep a pace, acceleration is there taking effect. Acceleration helps the players beat their opponents quickly with a quick burst. Acceleration helps on defense as well, when running back the player must accelerate to get in front of the offensive player. The amount of acceleration depends on how far the ball is from the player and how far the opponent is from the player. The player must determine how much acceleration they must use to get to the opponent at the precise time. Acceleration again is a huge part in soccer because it affects the running and timing of the play and changes the whole game.

The Magnus effect is a big part of soccer, it mainly takes place in the ball but is influenced by the player kicking the ball. When a soccer player kicks a soccer ball they can kick it from a variety of ways. From the side, underneath, on top or in the center. Depending on where they hit the ball is how much it will curve side to side or spin backwards or forwards. This curve or spin is the Magnus effect taking place on the ball because where the players kick is placed affects the balls spin and curve and that is the Magnus effect. The Magnus effect can only take place because of gravity, which is mainly what affects the ball.

The gravity on a soccer ball is strongly affected by many different factors. The weight of the ball, the drag caused by wind or a object in the way, the lift and spin other wise known as the Magnus effect, the direction and the rotation. Gravity determines where the ball falls and which direction it goes but the player can affect it too as well as gravity.

Momentum on a soccer player is affected by many things. Including the players speed and mass. The players momentum shifts throughout the different times of the game. It can be greater in more situations than others also less in other situations. Say a player is on a fast break away and they increase there acceleration. There momentum shifts to a higher state as for the defense the player are not as active. The momentum is also affected by the players mass. When collisions happen two player paths cross and depending on the players mass and speed the greater mass and speed will prevail.

The speed and mass take effect because the larger and faster is the greater momentum so that player would win that battle between the ball and the other opponent he his facing. This collision and momentum is strongly influenced by the acceleration of the player. Acceleration is another huge part of soccer, whether the player needs to speed up or slow down or keep a pace, acceleration is there taking effect. Acceleration helps the players beat their opponents quickly with a quick burst. Acceleration helps on defense as well, when running back the player must accelerate to get in front of the offensive player. The amount of acceleration depends on how far the ball is from the player and how far the opponent is from the player.

The player must determine how much acceleration they must use to get to the opponent at the precise time. Acceleration again is a huge part in soccer because it affects the running and timing of the play and changes the whole game.

Furthermore, Newton’s three laws play a huge role in soccer. Newton’s first law of inertia states that an object at rest will remain at rest, and an object at motion will remain at motion until acted upon by an unbalanced force. This law is seen in soccer in that when a ball is kicked or thrown, it will remain in motion until an unbalanced force such as a player, friction from the soccer field, or the goal post interferes with the soccer ball; on the other hand, when a soccer ball is placed stationary on the ground, it will remain at rest until an unbalanced force acts on it (Acevedo, para. 1, 2). Next, Newton’s second law of motion relates force, mass, and acceleration in the formula Fma.

According to this equation, the more force that a soccer ball is kicked with then the larger acceleration the ball will have since the mass will always stay the same (Acevedo, para. 3, 4). Lastly, Newton’s third law of motion states that for every action force there is an opposite but equal reaction force. This is seen in that whenever a soccer player kicks a soccer ball, he will feel a reaction force from the soccer ball onto his foot, but it is not as strong because according to Newton’s second law of motion F=ma since the soccer player’s foot has more mass he will feel less acceleration (Acevedo, para. 5, 6). As shown, Newton’s three laws of motion impact soccer significantly.

Soccer would not be able to be played unless physics had so strongly played its role in the sport. Soccer relies heavily on physics, and when considered carefully, other things such as playing other sports or a country’s economy also depend on physics. People do not realize of how strongly related physics is to not only soccer and entertainment but to every part of their lives. Understanding physics will not only help us play soccer but will also help us to follow Genesis 1:28 in which God commands people to be fruitful and have dominion over the earth (New King James Version, Genesis 1:28). God created the rules of physics for humans to learn and to use to benefit His creation.

Works Cited

Acevedo, Juan. Momentum and Impulse. Http://Ffden-2.Phys.uaf.edu, Professor David Newman, 2006, ffden-2.phys.uaf.edu/webproj/211_fall_2016/Juan_Acevedo/Juan_Acevedo/Momentum%20and%20Impulse.html.
Acevedo, Juan. Newton’s Laws of Motion. Http://Ffden-2.Phys.uaf.edu, Professor David Newman, 2006, ffden-2.phys.uaf.edu/webproj/211_fall_2016/Juan_Acevedo/Juan_Acevedo/Newtons%20Laws%20Of%20Motion.html.
Hall, Nancy. Forces on a Soccer Ball. NASA, NASA, www.grc.nasa.gov/www/k-12/airplane/socforce.html.
The Bible. New King James Version, Thomas Nelson Inc., 2006.
https://soccerphysicsproject.weebly.com/friction-description.html
https://rachaeldsoccer.weebly.com/acceleration—speed—velocity—soccer.html
https://www.real-world-physics-problems.com/physics-of-soccer.html

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