Love in Jane Eyre

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Jane Eyre pass ten years of suffering and she is about twenty when she gets married with an only person she loves. “Reader, I married him.” Jane Eyre declared with happiness. Finally, Jane Eyre becomes rich and happy with her inheritance, has two cousins, becomes wife of Mr Rochester.

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“Love in Jane Eyre”

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While Jane Eyre declares her triumph, Charlotte Brontë was very reluctant and did not had that joy of saying so. Charlotte Brontë got married very late with a person she perhaps did not love. She married a man who can help her to care for her father. While Jane Eyre and Mr Rochester hug a beautiful love for months, Charlotte Brontë did not have any romantic love. No one could make her happy. She had to accept a clergyman who can support her father because of duty, responsibility.

Mr. Rochester continued blind the first two years of our union; perhaps it was that circumstance that drew us so very near — that knit us so very close: for I was then his vision, as I am still his right hand. Literally, I was (what he often called me) the apple of his eye. He saw nature — he saw books through me; and never did I weary of gazing for his behalf, and of putting into words the effect of field, tree, town, river, cloud, sunbeam — of the landscape before us; of the weather round us — and impressing by sound on his ear what light could no longer stamp on his eye.

This passage reveals that Jane Eyre becomes the eye, the bridge between Mr Rochester and the world. Through Jane Eyre, Mr Rochester can feel the world outside. Jane Eyre stands between Mr Rochester and the world but does not cover his sight. This constrasts to the previous stage in Thornfield before the failed wedding when Rochester stands between Jane Eyre and God and Jane does not see anything apart Rochester, in order words, she becomes blind in the light of dominated passion.

My future husband was becoming to me my whole world; and more than the world: almost my hope of heaven. He stood between me and every thought of religion, as an eclipse intervenes between man and the broad sun. I could not, in those days, see God for His creature: of whom I had made an idol.

I have now been married ten years. I know what it is to live entirely for and with what I love best on earth. I hold myself supremely blest — blest beyond what language can express; because I am my husband’s life as fully is he is mine. No woman was ever nearer to her mate than I am: ever more absolutely bone of his bone and flesh of his flesh. I know no weariness of my Edward’s society: he knows none of mine, any more than we each do of the pulsation of the heart that beats in our separate bosoms; consequently, we are ever together. To be together is for us to be at once as free as in solitude, as gay as in company.

Jane Eyre reads and writes for Mr Rochester is similar to the fact that Charlotte Brontë did the similar works for her father that she described in a letter she sent to M. Héger.

What is unprecedented is that this novel, conceived of from restraint and dissatisfaction, from constrained understanding and less expectation, has offered an understanding into psychosexual connections that was visionary at that time and stays dynamic in our own time. Jane Eyre faces the reality of society that is psychological as well as social forces and conflicts through various landscapes of Gateshead, of Lowood, of Thornfield, of Marsh End, and of Ferndean – themselves all scenes of mental improvement. Jane Eyre develops her spiral psychology. To the degree that social and mental powers are bigger, it offers likewise the bigger achievement. The last section starts with an unprecedented declaration that spots Jane Eyre at the focal point of the relationship. That is the idealized resolution, the psychosexual romance, the interior sincerity, the reality of fantasy, the reality of legend and the realization of dream of Charlotte Brontë.

The difference between Jane Eyre’s life and Charlotte Brontë’s life is the love union. Jane Eyre hears the proposal of marriage from Mr Rochester the second time. That is the utterances which Charlotte Brontë wished to hear from M. Héger but in vain. Charlotte Brontë used her novel to realize her dream of love. She associated life and fiction, fact and imagination, reality and romance. She attempted to gain satisfaction in her fictional novel because she cannot obtain it in her real life. She achieved her wish when she made Mr Rochester admit his love for Jane Eyre. Jane Eyre has the capability to accomplish her wish and fulfill her life while Charlotte Brontë was not able to.

When Charlotte Brontë wrote Jane Eyre, she was unsatisfied, lonely and single. She liberated her protagonist from a tragic fate. Through Jane Eyre, Charlotte Brontë kept on basing on her cathartic experience in Brussels. By letting Thornfield destroyed, arranging the marriage status of Mr Rochester and having Jane Eyre win the heart of Mr Rochester, Charlotte Brontë found a definitive achievement that she could not handle on in her own life, in other words, found the way to satisfy the love of Jane Eyre. This showed both the dream that still stayed in Charlotte Brontë‘s psyche and her coalition with Jane Eyre, to whom she stayed unwavering by defining her character’s should be adored. The demand to be loved of Jane Eyre is fulfilled while Charlotte Brontë’s wish was not.

But Charlotte Brontë never surrendered. Charlotte Brontë bond with her character mirrors her dependability to herself, despite the fact that Charlotte Brontë frequently endures in her very own life, her flexibility drives her to push ahead. By continually advancing as an author and as a lady, she declines to submit to her sadness. She could not grasp her love, in contrast, she accomplished her career as a writer and her duty in the family. One of her success is that she permit her heroine declare the victory that Charlotte Brontë never fulfilled.

The conclusion of the novel stirred up many viewpoints. First, Jane Eyre loses her autonomy – no longer her very own individual. She combines and merges with Mr Rochester. She shares his heart and his body. Second, she loses her ability to think and express – two qualities that have characterized her for a large portion of the novel. In conversation with Mr Rochester, she she talks what Mr Rochester thinks and vice versa. Ten years in married life, she cannot use any language to express. Perhaps that is because she is too happy to need to think or express anything, except the perfect happiness.

Third, she affirms her equality. She does not give up anything when going to Mr Rochester the second timeIt is her free choice. Mr Rochester loses his house and becomes disable and blindness, and he has moral inferior because of the revelation of his past mistakes. He loses his role of financial and spiritual master. But the fact that he is available is vital. Fourth, Jane Eyre has other familial relation rather than only the love with Mr Rochester. She has Mary and Diana who can share her internal life and interest. Fifth, she escapes the stifling life with St John. By going into marriage with Mr Rochester, Jane enters into a kind of ‘bond’; yet from multiple points of view this ‘bond’ is the ‘escape’ that she has looked for from the beginning. Finally, she obtains the freedom and we recall her tragic paradox childhood and girlhood.

Jane Eyre has a boy, has already ten years of perfect happiness and the rest of her life. Charlotte Brontë, dividing her time between the writing of her novel and the nursing of her weak and sightless father, could well have spoken these words with Jane Eyre. They belong to the virginal daughter who has been magically transformed – without the mediation of sexual contact – into the noble figure of the nurturing mother. Once the magical transformation has taken place, the dependence defined, the partial restoration of Mr Rochester’s vision cannot reverse the pattern of the relationship any more easily than the removal of Patrick Brontë’s cataracts could completely reestablish the old patriarchal order.

“Mr Rochester, if ever I did a good deed in my life—if ever I thought a good thought—if ever I prayed a sincere and blameless prayer—if ever I wished a righteous wish,—I am rewarded now. To be your wife is, for me, to be as happy as I can be on earth.”

I have now been married ten years. I know what it is to live entirely for and with what I love best on earth. I hold myself supremely blest—blest beyond what language can express; because I am my husband’s life as fully as he is mine. No woman was ever nearer to her mate than I am: ever more absolutely bone of his bone and flesh of his flesh. I know no weariness of my Edward’s society: he knows none of mine, any more than we each do of the pulsation of the heart that beats in our separate bosoms; consequently, we are ever together. To be together is for us to be at once as free as in solitude, as gay as in company. We talk, I believe, all day long: to talk to each other is but a more animated and an audible thinking. All my confidence is bestowed on him, all his confidence is devoted to me; we are precisely suited in character—perfect concord is the result.

When his first-born was put into his arms, he could see that the boy had inherited his own eyes, as they once were—large, brilliant, and black. On that occasion, he again, with a full heart, acknowledged that God had tempered judgment with mercy.

The suffering path of Charlotte Brontë is longer than with Jane Eyre. Till the moment of Jane Eyre was finished, she is at nearly at the same age as Charlotte Brontë. However, Charlotte Brontë still struggled to earn a livelihood. Charlotte Brontë passed thirty-eight years of suffering and had only less than one year of happiness and then passed away. Worse of all, Charlotte Brontë did not a chance to see her child. Charlotte Brontë died during pregnancy and never had any time left to give birth. She did not have a happy ending.

Concerning love, they demanded a true love. But after all, Jane Eyre had to rely on hazard luck to obtain her inherited property, love and her dream in her small happy family. The fight now reduced to a small scale of a family. (Wheeler, 2014) Jane Eyre marries a disabled, poor, blind man, a widow. At last, Jane Eyre became a stronger partner in her relationship with Mr Rochester. She had her pride in front of her husband. (Wheeler, 2014) The love dream of Jane Eyre became real but Charlotte Brontë not. Charlotte Brontë married a man she did not love and died in pregnancy. This is a bankruptcy in marriage. In effet, Sir Wemyss Reid (1877) classified Jane Eyre as a compromised marriage {Mitchell, 1994 #5}. Jane Eyre sacrifices Thornfield and the physical integrity of Mr Rochester to obtain the equality and mental integrity for Jane Eyre and Mr Rochester. Meanwhile, Charlotte Brontë obtained the temporary equality through the fact that her father’s health declined and her younger brother was disorientated in life.

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Love in Jane Eyre. (2021, Jun 06). Retrieved January 30, 2023 , from
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